TOPIC: LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION OF HEALTH CARE PERSONEL WITH EMPHASIS ON NURSING SHORTAGE FROM SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Globally the World Health Organization [WHO] estimates a shortage of almost 4.3 million nurses, physicians and other health human resources worldwide resulting from underinvestment in health care education, retraining, recruitment, remuneration, retention, working environment and management. Migration appears to have impacted negatively on professional health care especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

In this paper analysis of relevant literature is used to discuss issues and challenges migration poses. The overwhelming finding is the problem is likely to grow over the next 5years or so.

Ethical concerns include “Brain Drain’ or “Brain Wastage” with a more compromising terminology “Brain Recycling” not forgetting the huge boost in monetary terms nurses and other health care professionals remit home to support large families. Newer interesting trends are doctor/ physician turned nurses - “MD-RN”/ “MBCHB-RN” – exploiting this lucrative overseas investment.

Impact directly on healthcare is more devastating with increased patient work load, risk of error and patient safety breakdown in infection control and health professional burnout syndrome aggravating shortages. Action is required at various policy levels especially at source regions to mitigate the negative effects of migration and finally reach a dialogue with receiving countries

G.P. Yossa,
Aga Khan Hospital – Mombasa Bomu Hospital
Mombasa Pandya Memorial Hospital (Office)
Mombasa Mewa Hospital – Mombasa

R. Waasula
Critical Care Link Nurses Coast Cardiac